FAQs

Q?

If I volunteer for a clinical research study, can I start taking new medicines prescribed by my personal doctor or primary care provider?

A.

The short answer is “yes”. If your personal provider feels a new medication is necessary, they are free to prescribe it without requiring any type of permission from SEC Clinical Research. In some cases, a new medicine – particularly one that treats the same condition be addressed in the clinical research study, could require that the investigational medicine be stopped. If this is the case, SEC Clinical Research might confer with your provider to insure they are aware of your participation in the research study.

Q?

How long is a typical clinical research study?

A.

Typical clinical research studies require a volunteer to attend visits anywhere from a few weeks to a year. Some research studies can last more than a year. The length of your participation is explained clearly and in detail in the Informed Consent Form.

Q?

How much time does a research visit take?

A.

This varies widely, but a typical range is 1 – 4 hours, and these estimates are also provided in the Informed Consent Form. One thing you will not do is spend a lot of time in our waiting room. Each visit is assigned to a Clinical Research Coordinator who will be on a tight schedule to complete visit tasks on an assigned time schedule – so if your visit is scheduled at 8AM, you will likely be escorted to your visit room at 8AM and the visit started promptly.

Q?

How much money can I expect to be paid for each visit?

A.

One aspect of human subject protection is the avoidance of a strong financial incentive to participate in research, to the point where you might overlook or not properly consider potential risk of your participation. As a result, payments must be modest, and are fixed by the Sponsor and IRB. Typically research visit payments range from $50 – 75, longer visits are usually higher amounts and roughly proportionate to the amount of time required.

Q?

Are all SEC Clinical Research studies available at all sites?

A.

Generally not. In the page that outlines our current research studies: Clinical Studies, we specify which site is offering the study – and that is the only site where the study can by conducted.

Q?

I am interested in one of your research studies, but not sure if I qualify. What should I do?

A.

By all means, give us a call and let’s talk. For some conditions, such as COPD, we can often provide free testing to determine if you might be eligible. Please call us at 334-504-7014.