Andalusia – Enrolling Now

  1. Boreas, “A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group, 52-week pivotal study to assess the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of Dupilumab in patients with moderate-to-severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) with Type 2 inflammation.”

    We need volunteers who have experienced at least two flare-ups (exacerbations) of COPD within the past 12 months in spite of taking long acting respiratory inhalers. This study is evaluating an injection therapy as a possible means of reducing the frequency of COPD exacerbations.

  2. GALACTIC-1 - "A randomized, double-blind, multicenter, parallel, placebo-controlled Phase 2b study in subjects with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) investigating the efficacy and safety of TD139, an inhaled galectin-3 inhibitor administered via a dry powder inhaler over 52 weeks."

    Individuals with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) are needed for a 2 year study testing an inhaled investigational medicine that would be added to present therapy.

  3. A phase 3, randomized, placebo-controlled, 12-week double-blind study, followed by a non-controlled extension treatment period, to assess the efficacy and safety of fezolinetant in women suffering from moderate to severe vasomotor symptoms (hot flashes) associated with menopause

    We are looking for menopausal women with frequent hot flashes interested in testing an investigational medicine for ability to reduce hot flash frequency.

  4. A randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind phase 3 clinical study to investigate the long-term safety of fezolinetant in women suffering from vasomotor symptoms (hot flashes) associated with menopause

    Similar to the prior hot flash study, but does not require as high a frequency of hot flashes, a one year study.

  5. A 24-week multi-center, double-blind, placebo controlled dose-range finding study to investigate the efficacy and safety of oral QBW251 in COPD patients on triple inhaled therapy (LABA/LAMA/ICS)

    This study is evaluating whether a novel investigational medicine taken as a pill can reduce the frequency of COPD exacerbations in individuals with a history of frequent exacerbations in spite of taking long acting inhaler therapies.